Breastfeeding Carnival: Day 6

Welcome to The Breastfeeding Cafe Carnival!

This post was written as part of The Breastfeeding Cafe’s Carnival. For more info on the Breastfeeding Cafe, go to www.breastfeedingcafe.wordpress.com. For more info on the Carnival or if you want to participate, contact Claire at clindstrom2 {at} gmail {dot} com. Today’s post is about how the mothers before you influenced your choice to breastfeed. Please read the other blogs in today’s carnival listed below and check back for more posts July 18th through the 31st!


Birth Experience: How did your birth experience affect your decision to breastfeed? Did the people present at your child’s birth truly support breastfeeding? Did you get off to a good start or did you have to fight to figure things out? Did you receive good information on breastfeeding from your birth attendants?

My birth experience didn’t influence my decision to breastfeed, but my final birth did influence how difficult it was to breastfeed.

My fourth child was a C-Section after one induced, epidural birth, and two induced but painkiller free births. With my first three, I was induced two weeks after the due date. With my last, I was induced one week BEFORE my due date. I was dilated to 10 and pushed and pushed, but he didn’t budget. He was comletely stuck at the cervix, so after consulting with another doctor, my Obsetrician recommended a C-Section. She said she was concerned that this was my fourth child, and was concerned that he may have been tangled in the cord or unable to move through the birth canal for other reasons. I consented because I wanted to make sure he was safe.

I lost a lot of blood during the C-Section and was very anemic after the surgery. I was alone in the hospital for nearly an entire week with the baby. My husband had three small children to take care of at home, and tried to visit once a day with them, but they were so wild when he was there, that I got very little help. Getting out of bed alone was very, very difficult with the surgery and stitches. It was difficult to position the baby while sitting up in the hospital bed, and very difficult to adjust my positioning in a narrow hospital bed, while I couldn’t even sit up without pulling on the side rails. My wonderful nursing pillow was almost useless in the bed position, and side-lying was impossible. Add to that, a baby who couldn’t or wouldn’t open his mouth very wide to nurse comfortably, and it was a recipe for disaster. I was convinced that he had a hard time nursing because he was born three weeks too soon. All of my children were two weeks late, and him being induced one week early meant he was three weeks younger than his sisters were.

I nursed and cried and supplemented with formula, but was determined to work it out. I gave him very little formula after nursing. I would allow him to suck for a few seconds, then remove the bottle and wait for his reaction to make sure he didn’t overeat as I wanted him to be hungry in 2 hours like he would be with straight nursing. I got the slowest flow nipples I could, as well. Finally, after a MONTH of work, work, work, he was nursing full time, no supplementing, and he’s 26 months now and still nursing.
 


 
Here are more post by the Breastfeeding Cafe Carnival participants! Check back because more will be added throughout the day.

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3 Comments

Filed under breastfeeding

3 responses to “Breastfeeding Carnival: Day 6

  1. Pingback: Setting Myself Up For Success « The Adventures of Lactating Girl

  2. Pingback: Prepare for Natural Birth, Prepare to Breastfeed | the BREASTFEEDING CAFE

  3. Pingback: Natural Urban Mamas » Birth Experience. Maybe. Cheering Squad. Definitely!

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